Haute horlogerie might sound like an intimidating term to describe the pinnacle of watchmaking. But, like the terms haute cuisine and haute couture applied to cooking and clothing respectively, it simply refers to the highest expression of the watchmaker’s art – in this case, the fashionable elegance that is watch craftsmanship.

And time, to borrow an expression, never stands still. Since its establishment in 1868, the International Watch Company (IWC) has prided itself on continual development and improvement in all the facts of watchmaking. These include movements, functional displays and intricate case craftmanship. The complication or intricate features of IWC’s mechanical watches, such as the perpetual calendar, constant-force tourbillon and minute repeater are both historically significant and incredible achievements of artistry, says the timepiece manufacturer.

In the video series “The Man’s Guide to Haute Horlogerie”, IWC endeavours to give casual watchlovers and horology enthusiasts insight into the the world of Haute Horlogerie made in Schaffhausen.

Watch the first video in the series of seven below. This video takes a look at the Tourbillon, an intricate part of the mechanical watch. Museum curator David Seyffer shares detail about the Tourbillon, and some practical application insights. IWC’s technical director, Stefan Ihnen, explains how Tourbillons are constructed and, most noteworthy, how they work.

Episode 1: Man’s Guide to Haute Horlogerie

Video and image credit: IWC Schaffhausen