If you’re pressed for time: yes, and it’s all our fault.

At IFA 2016 Motorola (owned by Chinese manufacturer Lenovo) proudly marched out the Moto Z Play handset and a companion snap-on Moto Mod developed by Hasselblad to much fanfare. It has since turned out to be a bit rubbish because you get better quality images from the Moto Z play standard camera.

Sony did a similar thing with the DSC-QX100 and got curbed stomped by tech media even though you could control it remotely and were not forced to have it attached to the back of your phone at all times.

But that’s not the point. My point stems from Huawei’s much maligned Leica partnership in the P9 camera system. In the weeks leading up to the April P9 London launch – and even now – there was a buzz surrounding the so-called dubious Leica branding. It got so bad that there were device teardowns and scrutiny devoted to finding the “true” developers behind the cameras.

The Huawei P9 camera turned out to be incredible. Most regular shots are essentially an HDR composite of the monochrome and RGB sensors that really adds a good depth to the images. That there’s a completely separate monochrome camera built in also changes the way users consider photography and has reignited the monochrome craze.

We can easily call the device groundbreaking now, but where are the apologies from the previious critics who were “acting in the consumer’s interest” by exposing Huawei for doing a dodgy deal? Those critics are too busy coming off of the hype cycle for the Hasselblad-built disaster or salivating over today’s Apple anouncement of a finally competitive camera system (top three on my list is currently Samsung Galaxy S7, Huawei P9 and LG’s equally berated G5).

Ironically the anticipated iPhone will be endowed with a dual camera system along the lines of LG’s poor-performing G5 – another product that deserves more praise for being a very capable 2016 flagship.

Bottom line: quality will always win out in the end, just ask huawei who have moved 6-million P9s into the market to date, but the hype will always follow the darlings of the industry. Samsung are currently on a great wicket and are launching some of the most flawless devices the world has ever seen, but tech reporters – me included – need to broaden our understanding of technology so that we can better serve consumers by highlighting the leaps lesser-loved brands are making.

Yes, there’s a Huawei sponsored feature floating around this website, but these are my honest feelings and thoughts from someone who sometimes fails to acknowledge the true industry leaders.