The Greek island of Antikythera on the edge of the Aegean Sea might just be the proverbial goldmine for sunken historical treasures. The shipwreck site first yielded a very advanced astronomical instrument from the second century in July 1901, and now a 2 000-year-old human skeleton has been found there also.

On 31 August a team of researchers discovered a human skeleton buried underneath half a metre of sand and pottery shards. The discovery included a partial skull with three teeth, two arm bones, several rib pieces and two femurs – all believed to be from the same person.

Nature reports that underwater discoveries of intact human remains are very rare. Skeletons and bones that are not preserved and covered by sediment decay, are eaten by fish or get swept away by the tides.

Watch the video above for more about the discovery or click here head over to Nature’s website and read more.

Source: Nature