Saturn and One of its Moons, Dione

  • This image may seem like some kind of artist's rendering, but it’s an actual true-color photograph showing Saturn, its rings, and one of its moons, Dione.
  • This image may seem like some kind of artist's rendering, but it’s an actual true-color photograph showing Saturn, its rings, and one of its moons, Dione.
  • This image may seem like some kind of artist's rendering, but it’s an actual true-color photograph showing Saturn, its rings, and one of its moons, Dione.
  • This image may seem like some kind of artist's rendering, but it’s an actual true-color photograph showing Saturn, its rings, and one of its moons, Dione.
  • This image may seem like some kind of artist's rendering, but it’s an actual true-color photograph showing Saturn, its rings, and one of its moons, Dione.
Date:21 January 2015 Author: William Horne Tags:, , , , , , , ,

The photograph was captured by the Cassini space probe. The probe was launched in 1997, and arrived at Saturn seven years later.

On October 11th, 2005, Cassini captured the image above while orbiting Saturn. The moon in the image, Dione, was 38 000 km away from Cassini when the photo was taken.

NASA created this color image by combining a number of photos captured using different filters, producing a version that approximates what the human eye would see in that spot.

This is a standard practice with space photography, because the atmosphere on Earth has a unique effect on the way we perceive colours that is not present in outer space or other planets with a different atmospheric composition. This means that, in conjunction with hardware limitations when it comes to cameras on board these spacecraft, a lot of science has to go into deciphering an image to ascertain what it would really look like to the human eye.

NASA points out that Dione — like most of Saturn’s icy moons — looks pretty much the same in both color and monochrome photographs, though.