Japanese premium brand Lexus has unveiled a full-scale replica of its IS sedan in celebration of the firm’s takumi  (artisan) craftsmen and women. Inspired by origami, the life-sized IS was put together using 1 700 sheets of recyclable cardboard sheets on a steel and aluminium frame.

The Origami IS was put together by a team of five, from specialist companies Lasercut Works, and Scales and Models in cooperation with Lexus, while DS Smith supplied the cardboard. The vehicle isn’t just a garage queen, though, as it’s driven by an electric motor that powers the functional wheels.

Also fully functioning are the doors and headlamps. The cabin boasts a full set of appointments – or at least are where you would expect to find the usual bells and whistles – except that most items are not really movable or operational.

“This was a very demanding job, with five people involved in the digital design, modelling, laser cutting and assembly. Just like Lexus, we were committed to producing the best possible quality,” says Ruben Marcos, Scales and Models Company founder and director.

The process, which took a mammoth three months to finish the single vehicle, required the utmost accuracy. Lexus provided the creative team with a digital 3D model, which was then divided into key areas such as exterior, facia, seats and steering wheel. After being digitally rendered into 10 mm slices, the panels were given their own reference numbers to ensure that the right pieces were fitted in the correct sequence. The entire build was constructed by hand and wood glue was used to bond the panels together.