The Toyota Hilux, the best-selling pick-up by the Japanese firm, is now available in a new generation. Thanks to a significant effort by its rivals over the past decade to topple the legendary pick-up’s dominance of local sales charts, Toyota says the new Hilux now features even more refinement and comfort, while remaining true to the ruggedness that brand loyalists have come to expect.

Within the light commercial vehicle market customers no longer only expect toughness and durability from their bakkie, but are placing much greater emphasis on comfort, convenience and design. The bakkie of today needs to fulfil a multi-purpose role, and not merely as a jack-of-all-trades but in fact it needs to be a master of all.

Visually, the new Hilux has been immensely overhauled. The horizontal bars across the grille and long wraparound headlamps add plenty of rear-view mirror aggression, while the slanted side glass and cab design, and squared-off wheelarches provide the illusion of even more length – the Hilux is now similarly sized to rivals that have had the ace in that department.

Inside, the Hilux boasts metallic contrasting trim, a touch-screen infotainment display, 4,2-inch TFT display in the instrument panel and durable black seat upholstery (leather optional on the high-specification models).

There’s been a focus on optimizing the cabin space – resulting in more room for all the occupants – and the employment of more storage spaces like the a recess under the 60:40 split rear bench on double-cab models, large centre console, 1,0-litre bottle-holding door pockets, and the “cool box” second glove compartment that can be heated or cooled via the Hilux’s air-conditioning system.

The new Hilux features a range of newly developed engines, such the “Global Diesel” intercooled, turbodiesel four-cylinder motors in 2,4- and 2,8-litre guise. They produce 110 kW/343 N.m of torque (there’s a higher spec version of the 2,4 with 400 N.m available as well) and 130 kW/420 N.m respectively.

Those who prefer petrol-powered four-cylinder engines can opt for either a 110 kW/182 N.m 2,0-litre or a 122 kW/245 N.m 2,7-litre. The range-topper is the familiar 4,0-litre V6 with 175 kW and 376 N.m of torque. Workhorse models make use of a five-speed manual gearbox, while higher-specification units have the option of a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic.

Single cab:

From R228 900 to R 435 900

Xtra cab:

From R333 900 to R470 900

Double cab:

From R 377 900 to R593 900