Bike ace Cavendish inspires Oakley’s high-tech new Jawbreaker shades

  • Eye tracking, used to study potential improvements to a rider’s field of vision, showed that the upper periphery of the lens is crucial to give the visual field cyclists need for performance and safety.
  • Mark Cavendish challenged sunglasses manufacturer Oakley to come up with "armour for speed".
  • A new lens technology, Prizm Road, fine-tunes vision for cyclists by emphasizing colours where the eye is most sensitive, so riders can spot subtle changes in the texture of road surfaces. oo9290-11 jawbreaker
Date:2 April 2015 Tags:, ,

Cycling’s master Finisher, Mark Cavendish, collaborated with Oakley on the design of what the Tour de France legend called an “armour for speed.” 

True to that challenge, the Jawbreaker has  impact-resistant single shield lenses. But there’s a lot more to these high-tech glasses. In terms of ventilation, field of view and eye protection, the Jawbreaker is described as a distinct step up from  average eyewear.

Why Jawbreaker? That’s all about the gimbal mechanism that pivots to separate the bottom frame or lower “jaw” from the upper frame while switching out lenses. Switchlock technology allows fast, secure lens changes for any environment.

To aid vision, Jawbreaker incorporates a new lens technology, Prizm Road. This fine-tunes vision for cyclists by emphasising colours where the eye is most sensitive. That’s said to make it easier for riders to spot subtle changes in the texture of road surfaces.

An eye tracking system was used to study potential improvements to a rider’s field of vision. This showed the upper periphery of the lens is crucial to give the visual field cyclists need for performance and safety. Oakley maximised that lens zone for Jawbreaker to give the wearer an unprecedented field of view. In fact, the Jawbreaker  extends the upward field of view by 44 %, compared with the average pair of sunglasses.

In addition to that, integrated surge ports  enhance air flow and reduce fogging. The temples adjust to three different lengths for helmet compatibility, too.

According to Oakley, developing Jawbreaker took more than 100 design iterations, 9,600 hours of lab and field testing, 27 eyewear components and two years of work.

 

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