• This machine can produce 5 different types of waves

    Date:12 June 2020 Author: Kyro Mitchell

    An Australian company named Surf Lake has captured the feeling of surfing the perfect wave and found a way to reproduce that feeling time after time. They’ve managed to pull this off by using a giant machine to produce five different types of waves at the same time.

    Surf Lakes works using a Central Wave Device (CWD) to send out a variety of different waves in all directions. It’s not all down the CWD though, Surf Lake has studied how the submerged reefs and shorelines affect the way a wave breaks, and used that knowledge to create their very own mini reef in an artificial lake to manipulate the waves speed, shape, and size.

    You don’t need to be an expert to make the most of the world’s largest wave pool. The artificial lake is divided into different zones, depending on your skill level.

    Those new to surfing will begin at level 1, where white water calmly rolls through the inside of reefs, perfect for practicing how to paddle, time a wave, and stand up on a surf board. Level 2, while still relatively calm, features slightly larger and faster rolling waves. Level 3 is perfect for more advanced surfers looking to practice manoeuvres like difficult turns and aerial tricks. Levels 4 and 5 are where the CWD shows its true power. In these levels surfers can expect to encounter 2meter high waves with more speed, height, and power.

    “The most difficult part about surfing is repetition” explained former World Surf Champion Barton Lynch in a promotional video. “In sports, you can get repetition through consistent rehearsal in an environment that’s stable. In surfing, you just never have got that before, until now. Here you can advance up through those levels and rankings of waves to more challenging conditions. You can practice and rehearse what you want to do and your rate of improvement will be higher.”

    Take a look at the colossal wave machine in action below:

    Feature image: screenshot from video



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